Chalk Fire Burn Area & Wildflowers

This afternoon, I took a trip through the Chalk Fire Burn Area, looking for wildflowers, and found many. I’ll be posting a few examples here, over the next few days. Parts of the forest are still incredibly devastated, and others are recovering nicely. One thing that was just astounding was the vibrant green of the hills where the fire-retardant was dropped. I had been told years ago that it was a fertilizer, but boy, I’ve never seen the effect as clearly as I did today. I have shots of some of these places, or I watched, as the planes dropped the retardant. The affect is not to be believed. 

This is straight out of the camera, but it looks surreal! Wherever the retardant was dropped, is now an emerald field!

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South Coast Ridge Rd., and the forest it traverses, is still closed to the public from Nacimiento Rd. to Willow Creek Rd. However, many wildflowers are viewable from Nacimiento-Fergusson Rd. I’d advise caution, however, as there are LOTS of tourists on that road, at least today, and most of them were apparently afraid of the edge, and preferred the wrong side of the road! 

Watch for photos throughout the week. I will try to post one tonight as a teaser. ;-)

And finally, a note about our rather “overzealous” new USFS “cop” — please send or call with any serious stories, if you are willing to back them up, but also remember, we may be VERY glad to have him here this fire season. Note this morning:

“03/29/09 09:14 Big Sur, Mile Marker 14 Plasket Ridge Rd.  Report of illegal campfire, USFS responded with Law Enforcement, no fire.”

~ by bigsurkate on March 29, 2009.

4 Responses to “Chalk Fire Burn Area & Wildflowers”

  1. Kate, great Indian warrior photo. the plant actually lives in relationship with trees and shrubs and links with their roots. It needs it’s “Host” to help it grow.
    As for the new USFS law enforcement and the “illegal fire” , it was called in by a local and I bet many locals who are upset now will be glad to have someone ready to respond come summer and fall when the threat will be more serious.

  2. That’s right! I had forgotten about the parasitic nature of these flowers! I’m going back to try again, when I have time, to see if I can get the white balance correct. Needs a touch more blue on the Indian Warrior.

  3. Good stuff Kate!

  4. A green island in the midst of a ocean of dry brush and rock. Mother nature repairs herself. :)

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